Woman wearing face mask

May 22, 2020


The COVID-19 pandemic has isolated the world physically, and for some, even emotionally. The immense financial, personal, and emotional burdens of the COVID-19 pandemic put a major strain on people’s mental health.

Here are tips from experts on prioritizing your mental health during this challenging time.

1. Go outside

Get some fresh air! Dr. Eileen Feliciano, PsyD, a New York psychologist specializing in school and clinical psychology, suggested going outside for at least 30 minutes a day.

To limit contact, consider going out in the morning or later in the day and stick to less-populated areas. If you are high risk or live with someone who is high risk, open the windows and turn on a fan.

2. Notice the good in the world

https://www.facebook.com/avamere/photos/a.10158060596030480/10158171135570480/?type=3

It’s important to stay informed about COVID-19, but it’s good for your mental health to also focus on the good. Dr. Feliciano recommends counter-balancing the heavy information with hopeful information.

Avamere is publishing uplifting stories about #AvamereHeroes on social media, as well as many other positive stories of staff and local citizens doing good. Follow Avamere on Facebook to keep up with the positivity!

3. Call a friend or family member

We all experience the same crisis differently. The CDC recommends connecting with others to cope with stress. Reach out to a family member, friend, or co-worker. Share how you’re feeling, and listen to their thoughts too.

If you or someone you care about needs help, call 911 or contact the Disaster Distress Hotline at 1-800-985-5990.

4. Set a routine

You can keep this as simple or complex as you want! Get into a regular routine with mealtimes, study or work schedules, a bedtime routine, and more. Remember to set aside time for yourself too!

According to experts, the predictability of a set routine can help you feel more in control.

5. Call your healthcare provider or therapist

Reach out to your healthcare provider, counselor, or therapist when you need. They can provide you with the resources you need to prioritize your mental health.

Prioritize your mental health today and every day, during the COVID-19 pandemic and always.

If you or someone you know needs help, call 911 or contact the Disaster Distress Hotline at 1-800-985-5990.

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